About your Search

20120701
20120731
SHOW
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 44
WETA 22
KQED (PBS) 17
LANGUAGE
English 83
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
us. a conversation with erin brockovich coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: erin brockovich is a long time and our mental and clean water advocate who inspired the film featuring julia roberts. the film is playing in select cities. here is a scene from "last call at theasis." >> every single state has e-mail me with some sort of problem. 25,000 inquiries in one month, to the point where i have started to create a map and what is staring us is we still have 700 more entries to input so we're able to start connecting the dots to get some kind of -- there is some money accounts -- so many accounts of contamination. >> you have a fish kill here. we have lost over 1 billion fish. there were buried on the beach with bulldozers. >> we would take a glass of water and it would smell like diesel fuel. my life is o
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with former u.s. secretary of state colin powell. the decorated four-star general has a new book that focuses on the lessons he learned along the way about life and leadership. the new book is called "it worked for me." will talk about the american wars abroad, the crisis in syria, and the 2012 presidential race, of course. we are glad you could join us. the conversation colin powell, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we allit's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it is an honor to welcome colin powell back to this program. the former secretary of state and decorated four-star general is a best-selling author, whose latest book is called "it worked for me." he joins us from washington. secretary colin powell, good to have you back. >> good to be here, tavis. tavis: and a s
,000 inquiries in one month, to the point where i have started to create a map and what is staring us is we still have 700 more entries to input so we're able to start connecting the dots to get some kind of -- there is some money accounts -- so many accounts of contamination. >> you have a fish kill here. we have lost over 1 billion fish. there were buried on the beach with bulldozers. >> we would take a glass of water and it would smell like diesel fuel. my life is over without my water. >> six of our neighbors have had brain tumors and half of them ed. it was like, it is in the water. we have to get the kids out of here, we have to do something. >> i cannot just talk to you because it makes me think what is going on in arizona and alabama and washington and texas, because it is happening everywhere. tavis: we obviously did not plan this, i did not buy you have worked on the set days ago. you were at one of the superfund sites in this extreme heat. i was in north carolina with 105 degree temperatures every day. the conversation with this heat wave could be more -- could not be more auspicious.
and my sister to get to a hospital. she was so focused on us getting short, us getting help, so she walked, she walked with us, and that is the last thing she did. she walked us to the hospital, and then she passed away. three months in a hospital, three months later, we got adopted, and then really my life started again. it is funny in life. the worst thing that can ever possibly happen to you can also be helpful in a way. that was our ticket out, and i would never forget that, what our mother did. i feel with the work i do now, i honor that. i represent that village in everything i do. tavis: she walked. she walked for days. she walked about 75 miles. 75 miles she walked with two kids to make sure she save those lives. do you recall, do you have any memories? >> i do not. i have not seen a picture of my mother, and i talked about that in the book, but i know that woman. she may not have a lot of money, but she has a lot of wealth in dignity. she is strong, slim, and she wakes up at 2:00 in the morning and walks or two hours to get clean water for her kids. she can make a meal bett
in years. it is called "after hours." we are glad you joined us for our interview with glenn frey, coming up. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we're back with part two of the conversation with glenn frey. it was not supposed to happen this way, but sometimes you get a conversation that is so rich and inspiring and you want to spend more time with a great guy. we have a wonderful collection of standards and classics, and you will want to hear how he puts his own spin on this classics o stuff. we were in the middle of a story last night that i could not stop. you were talking about the heat is goneon. take of the story. >> i never thought i would get a song in beverly hills cop. they sent me this tape, and it sounded like something i might do, so i sang background vocals, and i did not think too much of it, and when the movie cam
of a device which is you have to write your own songs. jackson browne was very kind to a lot of us guys who were slain -- playing the folk music not circuit. i went on the road with linda ronstadt, and we have three days off. he said, what do you want to do? i said, let's go to muscle shoals. i called david geffen on, and i said, can i have $500 to do a demo? i spent $2,300. i was in there for two days, and i brought the stuff back to david geffen. not only was he man i spend extra money, but he was not too impressed. he said, you should be in a band. you can play to your strengths. you can hide your weaknesses. you can be around some guys who are good. i set out to put together a band, and i knew i wanted to be with don henley, and i wanted great singers as well as great players, and we told linda ronstadt we want to have our own band. we said, we want to have our own end. -- band. you know who would be really good with you is bernie. good night she brought him in, and -- she brought him in, and we met him, and she helped us get randy meissner to replace the bass player, so linda really he
the new eisenhower memorial. we are glad you could join us tonight. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: welcome back. our conversation with this icon, frank gehry. let us that we had a wonderful conversation. we talked about -- last night we had a wonderful conversation. we talked about his early life. his family life. if you did not get a chance to see it, go to our web site at pbs.org. i'm delighted to continue that conversation. when we finished last night, we were talking about bilbao. it is one thing to say what we say, what do you say. it seems to be that moment at which the world came to appreciate your gift. even here in los angeles. you had not been as regarded as you should have been until bilbao. what say you? >> should have been, i do not know. bilbao, i lucked out. i met a man who was the director. he was a genius in h
rises." more tonight on his life and career. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so last night things were just getting good when we had to end our conversation with morgan freeman, so thankfully he stuck around for another show so we can talk about "the dark knight rises," "the magic of belle isle," two wonderful projects he has coming out, and so much more about what it means to be morgan freeman in today's world. you were saying last night at the end of the conversation that you're a bit frightened, scared was your exact word -- >> yeah. tavis: -- of the other side if we do not reelect barack obama. >> yeah. one case in point, you look at the attempts to disenfranchise minority voters i use the term "minority" advisedly here, because the hispanic world is growing so fast that in no time at
has made us very vulnerable to heart disease. over the 20th century, heart disease went from a not-very- common cause of death to the number one cause of death not just in men but in men and women. tavis: i guess i am always troubled when i have these conversations, because it is sad to listen to that reality when this is one of those things that is, for the most part, preventable, yes? >> i think that the most amazing thing is that we actually understand the causes. you are completely right. we've got this one scientifically nailed. we know the causes yet they are rampant in our society. that is the most frustrating thing. i am a heart surgeon. i operate at the end of the line, when people have already got it, but it is preventable. >> but if you think about the big causes -- smoking; no one needs to smoke, and yet today our young people, they are taking up smoking. not as frequently as they did 20 years ago, but there are a lot of people smoking. obesity is on the rise in america, leading to diabetes, a major cause of heart disease. our diets are not healthy and people are not ex
associations and very visceral verb. and. >> rose: he would be prone to use. >> and then he takes a look at these 25 pages of notes he scrawled late at night in woodstock all by himself and what he sees in these notes are the lyrics to like a rolling stone. the very next week he goes into the cramped space of columbia records and on the fourth take they record those six punts of raw music that would revolutionize rock 'n' roll. >> and he understood it? >> >> rose: after it came out? >> yes and this is a defining feature of movements of insight that makes them so mysterious as soon as the answer pops in our head we know this is the answer. >> rose: you recognize it for what it is. >> you don't have to double-check the math or reread the lyrics you know this is a solution you have been searching for. >> rose: wow. so suppose that, suppose you know you know that you have hit a roadblock and you have hit a wall. >> yes the. >> rose: what ought you to do find a creative way around a wall. >> this was quite surprising to me, because i think we live in this day and age that worships attention.
voters i use the term "minority" advisedly here, because the hispanic world is growing so fast that in no time at all i expect that they will be in the majority. but my point is that women, hispanics, blacks, there is a large attempt, a great attempt at disenfranchisement. it's out in the open. this isn't like breaking news or anything. why is that? tavis: well, they would argue "voter fraud." >> yeah, but of all the people who are talking against that have asked for proof, and how much has arrived? tavis: precious little. >> precious little. so that isn't quite it. can't possibly be quite it. it has to be that they know that this group is going to be pretty firmly in the camp of barack obama. i certainly will, not only because he's doing a good job, i think, as president, but because his enemies are stepping out of closets. they're wide open. if somebody's going to spend $10 billion -- no, $10 million -- tavis: and more. >> i'm just talking about on one commercial. tavis: yeah. >> to downgrade you, because they got the money. brings up that other question about is the country
not need and changed some of the work rules in the factories, and that was a big deal. and used to be that you could only change a light bulb, for example, if your job classification was electrician, so even if you're qualified to change in light of, you had to wait for a guy from the other side of the factory to come and do that sort of thing, and that sort ofhing is pretty much gone now. i do not think that detroit is going to blow the japanese or korean car companies out of here. you have a more balanced situation, but they are holding their own. tavis: innovation is another. where does detroit rank now with creativity, innovation, style, for that kind of thing? >> well, it depends on what you are talking about really. picking one area. getting consumer electronics into automobiles. electronics making the driving experience easier and more enjoyable and that sort of thing. for example, ford for several years has had a voice recognition system, where you can basically give your radio or your cd player or york heater and air conditioner a verbal command. it is not perfect, no d
biden uses. this is a very, very big deal. this gives president obama the chance to go back to his base. i felt a different type of excitement and activism in the last week, where people are singing, wow, you know what? he has not done everything, but he has gotten a lot done. >> appreciate your self- censorship. >> yes, i was raised that way. >> thank you for that. this is not rocket science. i suspect this would also be raised higher the idea of the supreme court appointments. you have to take into account their age. with bared ginsberg. -- ruth ginsberg. this particular matter is, as it always does, particularly now for supreme court appointees. >> absolutely. i do not want to get carried away. i think chief justice roberts did the right thing, but he is a conservative. we saw it in citizens united. and i think we have had a number of us. quite honestly, we are frightened last week at the possibility of this ruling, not just because it strikes down the health-care law, which would of been a disaster in a lot of ways, but it really has been this incredible presidents of support of a p
revolutionize design. we are glad you joined us. conversation with frank gehry coming up. >> every community has a much to melissa king boulevard. it is a cornerstone reno. it is a place where walmart stands together with your community. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased and honored to welcome frank gehry to this program. he has put his stamp on the world of design. some of the most well-known structures around the globe. so much to get to in this conversation. frank gehry, an honor to have you on this program. >> honored to be with you. tavis: i have tonight and tomorrow night to talk to you. i cannot do justice to your life and legacy with two shows. i want to start at the beginning. i have been thinking for this, knowing you are coming to see me. i have been thinking how to squeeze so much into two nights. those of us who are fans of your work in l.a. and around the world know something about your design work. so few of us know about frank gehry. with your accommodation, i would like to talk about you. you were born toronto. how did yo
those basic questions that someone like marx and others wanted us to ask long ago. >> rose: i had a quote from you. >> okay. >> rose:. >> always dangerous. >> rose: to secure the source of reform achieved in the 20th century socialism and communism require doing more going -- require doing more, going further than reform is anywhere understood. >> right. that is my point. i think that if we take our own country as an example, we did extraordinary things in the 1930s in the face of a crisis, even worse than the one we are in now. you know, we are not we are now talking about making less social security, people have to remember in the depths of the depression is when we created social security. when everyone said there is no money to do such things as they are saying it now, roosevelt came and created a social security system, creates an unemployment compensation system, creates a federal employment program that filled 12 and a half million jobs between mean 34 and mean 41, all of the things that we are told today -- >> rose: and got everybody back to work. >> finally but a lot was
has his bluegrass festival, this year with steve martin. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with ed helms, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome ed after getting his start on "the daily show," he has gone on to tremendous success in television and film, including both "hangover" films. those two movies have sold more than $1 billion in tickets worldwide, so it probably does not come as a shock that another sequel is in the works. as i mentioned at the top, he is also the host of a music festival here in l.a., called bluegrass situation, running thursday through sunday, if you are in town this week. before we get to all that though, this month, he is also wrapping up the eighth season of the nbc series "the office," and so, here now, a scene from "the office." >> morning. somebody left in such a hurry this morning that she forgo
the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill:
narcissistic, because andy bernard makes all of us laugh. that regard. so we talked a moment ago about the fact that carell leaves the building, the series goes on, with changes, of course, for the eighth season. so what is going to happen? is there going to be a ninth season of "the office?" have they told you guys yet? >> they have not told us officially, but i think that we are sort of on that path. whether or not a tv series is in some ways a technicality, but it is an important one, and we actually have not crossed that official line, but i have every reason to believe that we will be back. tavis: "the office" is funny, and, obviously, people watch it for the laughs, but i sense that we watch "the office" for more than just the laughs. am i right about that? if i am, what else are we relating to in this sitcom? important, tavis. tavis: [laughter] >> we are changing culture, we are changing stereotypes and perceptions out there, and we are having an impact. i think that that is why i get a weekly call from barack obama, just to -- tavis: just to check in. [laughter] >> jjust to check in an
in the middle east that teach false use, for example, of israel. but also don't teach kids any form of education that would give them skills to get jobs in the global economy. technology skills, for example. when i was just in egypt it was interesting. i met some egyptians who were doing angel investing in egypt. imagine that. in young companies, stuff that we hope is going on in new york city as we're talking to each other. but they, of course said it depends on whether egypt is stable going for and whether we can find kids to filled jobs that going to be created. well, egypt going to be stable. can we find the jobs. that's up to egyptians but why i'm little bit hopeful is their form of government will have to include islamist parties. i think that's okay. having islamist, people with islamist belief inside the tent playing by democratic rules with a small d is much better than having al qaeda outside the tent trying to blow up the tent. >> rose: it will be interesting to see how islamist governments handle power and whether power and governance will change them? >> i think it will. again if de
are coming to see me. i have been thinking how to squeeze so much into two nights. those of us who are fans of your work in l.a. and around the world know something about your design work. so few of us know about frank gehry. with your accommodation, i would like to talk about you. you were born in toronto. how did your family make its way here? >> it is a sad story. my father was in canada. he was not an educated. he did not get high school. he grew up in new york. there was one famous person in our lives. she signed his affidavit of birth, it was ellen roth. i never met her. he was doing slot machines and pinball machines when i was a kid. they were in our basement, wherever we were. he was moving them around. it was made illegal in canada. it was the early 1940's. i was in high school. he tried other businesses. he failed. he got a heart attack. his brother brought him out to l.a. to cool out. he was broke. he became a truck driver for yankee doodle pop company. i got a job in the valley. i went to night school. i lived on the corner of ninth and burlington. it is still there. the buildi
could join us, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh serves as an editor at large at salon.com, and she is also -- also the author of attacks called "what's the matter went -- also the author of "what's the matter with white people." >> thanks, tavis. tavis: what is the book about >> it is about the nostalgia that people have that never fully existed. it was great for some people. we did build a wonderful middle class, will be excluded a lot of people from the dream. and when we extended the american dream to all americans, non-white people, things started to fall apart, and i think there is kind of a mistaken cause and effect. it was as if something fell apart because we try to extend posterity to more people. -- prosperity to new people. it became a deeply divisive issue. the democratic
of disillusioning but interesting. it is not far away and sort of presses upon us, i grew up in southern california so i was in mexico as a kid, i loved the country, actually, i mean, i would go there on my vacations still. >> rose: still? >> still. a lot of these tourist places, cancun, oaxaca really haven't been hit by the violence and even yourself you can go to mexico city and spend a week there and not realize that this country is in a serious -- >> rose: yes. >> even monterrey i was just there a couple of weeks ago and for the election, i was covering some election stuff there, and i was remarking to my colleagues, you know, if you were blindfolded and dropped into the middle of monterrey, right now and not knowing where you were, you wouldn't have this sense of bullets flying and people being kidnapped and so forth. it is very almost under the radar what is going on. >> rose: i mean a little bit, pardon me, is like the wild west, isn't it and that is part of what makes itÑi a story that makes it a story for movies, makes it a story for -- >> i mean the fascination, i have been in mexico or
in college sports, the tragedy at penn state. we're glad you have joined us. a conversation with mark emmert, coming up right now. >> every community has aartin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: since 2010, mark emmert has been serving as the president of the national collegiate -- in honor to have you on this program. you are the one guy i expected to cancel this week. with all the stuff on your plate, thank you for honoring a commitment to be here. let's start with the penn state stuff and get that out of the way. i think there will be reverberations for years to come. i want to discuss other things with you tonight. let me start by asking your overall thoughts on this scandal. >> i read the grand jury indictments, i listened to the testimony of victims through the trial. i have read the report a couple three times, i paid attention to all the other data. i hav
. tavis: let me go right inside the book. i was fascinated -- for those of us who are fans of yours, there is so much to learn about the back story to carole king. i assume you're okay talking about it because you wrote about it. let me put it as a question this way -- how much of your success today has to do with your brother? >> interesting question. my brother was intellectually disabled and he left the home and went into a place where they could take better care of him. they were more specialized. i felt the onus on me to be really excellent at everything to make up for what he could not do, so it definitely informed my life and my career. tavis: that comes through pretty loud and clear at the beginning, that you felt like you needed to step your game up, but for a person who was as young as you were, that's a lot of pressure to put on yourself. >> probably, but i did not see it as pressure. i just did it. does that make sense? it was, like, i did not have the pressure, i have got to be great, i have got to be excellent. i just felt the drive to do that and consequently was. it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)